Connected Device Growth and Potential Continue to Rise

In a pair of somewhat related announcements concerning the Xbox 360, Microsoft revealed that the gaming console will soon be the recipient of a still-hazy live TV streaming service, while also boasting that it has broken the 55 million unit barrier in year 6 of its life cycle. The streaming service, which the company declined to describe in any kind of detail, would “change living room entertainment forever,” according to the press release. Current Xbox Live subscribers already enjoy Netflix, Hulu Plus, and ESPN as streaming partners. As for the Xbox 360 sales numbers, not only has Microsoft sold a massive number of the ubiquitous white boxes, sales continue to accelerate due to upgrades and add-ons such as Kinect, a trend that “no other console in history can…claim.”

See http://www.engadget.com/2011/06/03/microsoft-sells-55-million-xbox-360-consoles-claims-thats-cons/
Also see http://www.fierceiptv.com/story/microsoft-softly-debuts-streaming-live-tv-xbox/2011-06-06?utm_medium=nl&utm_source=internal

Comcast to Deliver Content Via Internet Devices?

Comcast is planning to test a new system that would allow consumers to replace their set top box with any Internet-ready device, including gaming consoles or laptop computers. Starting this fall, Comcast will start test cycles at MIT to use its broadband network to deliver content using VoIP. Instead of using the same technology that currently allows a user to watch select television shows on his or her computer, this new venture has Comcast streaming their entire lineup over the Internet. While Comcast has maintained that it has no plans to offer this new system in areas it does not serve, it is technically feasible to do so, and probably has competitors like TimeWarner and Cablevision feeling pretty nervous.

For more, see http://www.allvoipnews.com/test-may-lead-to-tv-delivered-via-laptop-or-game-c.htmlt